November, 2005


29
Nov 05

Stevia

Stevia Stevia

Stevia is a genus of about 150 species of herbs and shrubs belonging to the sunflower family, native to subtropical and tropical South America and Central America.

For centuries, Stevia has been used as a sweetener in yerba mate and medicinal teas for treating such conditions as obesity, high blood pressure, and heartburn. It has recently seen greater attention with the rise in demand for low-carbohydrate, low-sugar food alternatives, and is widely used as a sweetener in Japan, and is available in the US and Canada as a health food supplement.


29
Nov 05

Splenda

Splenda Splenda

Splenda is 500–600 times as sweet as sucrose, making it roughly twice as sweet as saccharin and four times as sweet as aspartame. Unlike aspartame, it is stable under heat and over a broad range of pH conditions, and can be used in baking, or in products that require a long shelf life.

Splenda is popular with dieters, as it has a low glycemic index, meaning that it is less likely to raise insulin levels and cause fat storage.

The scientific name for Splenda is Sucralose. Splenda has been approved for consumption by both the European Commission and USA. Although the scientific evidence concludes sucralose is safe, some individuals and organizations remain skeptical that it poses no long-term health risk.


29
Nov 05

Black Magic Spells

Black Magic

Black magic is the branch of magic used to perform evil acts or draw on malevolent powers. Black magic is usually invoked to kill, injure or cause destruction. It may also be used for personal gain, for example to find love or make someone love you. Black magic involves:

* the use of “magic words” said to have the power to command spirits;
* the use of wands and other ritual tools;
* the use of a magic circle to defend the magician against the spirits he is invoking or evoking;
* the use of mysterious symbols or sigils thought useful to invoke or evoke spirits.

It is important to avoid malevolent magic, or interfering with the free will of another person, as black magic has the habit of backfiring on the inexperienced spellcaster.


29
Nov 05

Voodoo

Voodoo

The term Voodoo is applied to the branches of a West African ancestor-based spiritist-animist religious tradition. Voodoo is still practised in many areas around the world.

The practice of sticking pins in “voodoo dolls” has been used as a method of cursing an individual by some followers of what has come to be called “New Orleans Voodoo”, which is a local variant of hoodoo.

Voodoo can also be used to create happiness for the spell caster, in the form of love, money, good health and relationships with others.

It is important to exercise caution with vodoo – cursing others or influencing someone else’s free will may result in a spell backfiring on the inexperienced spell caster.


29
Nov 05

Copper

Copper

Copper is a reddish-coloured metal, with a high electrical and thermal conductivity. Copper has its characteristic color because it reflects red and orange light and absorbs other frequencies in the visible spectrum, due to its band structure.


29
Nov 05

Deer Hunt

deer hunt

Deer Hunting
is most commonly applied to the practice of pursuing deer to capture or kill them for food, sport, or trade in their products. Deer Hunting is regulated by the states.

Deer have long had economic significance to humans. While they are generally not as easily domesticated as sheep, goats, pigs, and even cattle, the association between people and deer is very old. Deer meat, for which they are hunted and farmed, is called venison.

Deer Hunting is a serious hobby, requiring specialist apparel and equipment, including guns and blinds – all of which are useful for improving the performance during the deer hunt.


29
Nov 05

Duck Hunting Apparel

Duck Hunting Apparel

Duck hunting is practised in all areas around the country. In many areas, wild ducks of various species are hunted for food or sport, by shooting, or formerly by decoys. From this came the expression “sitting duck” to mean “an easy target”.

Hunting of migratory waterfowl such as ducks, is regulated by the Federal government under treaties with Canada and Mexico since the birds do not recognize international political boundaries. The states usually adminster the federally-set regulations for duck hunting.

Duck hunting requires specialised equipment, including guns, and duck hunting apparel.


29
Nov 05

Wage Garnishment

Wage Garnishment

A garnishment is a means of collecting a monetary judgment against a defendant by ordering a third party (the garnishee) to pay money, otherwise owed to the defendant, directly to the plaintiff.

Wage garnishment, the most common type of garnishment, is the process of deducting money from an employee’s monetary compensation (including salary) as a result of a court order. Such payments are limited by federal law in the United States to 25 percent of the disposable income that the employee earns.

Garnishments can be taken for any type of debt but common examples of debt that result in garnishments include child support, taxes, and any other type of money judgment.

Garnishments are taken as part of the payroll process. When processing payroll, sometimes there is not enough money in the employee’s net pay to satisfy all of the garnishments.


29
Nov 05

Belly Dancing

Belly Dancing

Belly dance is a Western name coined for a style of dance developed in the Middle East and other Arabic-influenced areas.

Belly dancing is a good cardio-vascular work out, helps increase flexibility and focuses on the torso or ‘core muscles’.

Mental health benefits, for many bellydancers, include an improved sense of wellbeing, elevated body image and self-esteem as well as a generally positive outlook that comes with regular, enjoyable exercise.


29
Nov 05

Harmonicas

Harmonicas

A harmonica is a very common free reed musical wind instrument, having multiple, variably-tuned brass or bronze reeds, each secured at one end over an airway slot of like dimension into which it can freely vibrate, thus repeatedly interrupting an airstream to produce sound.

Unlike most free-reed instruments, the mouth harmonica lacks a keyboard. Instead, lips and tongue are used to select one or a few of the several holes arranged usually linearly on a mouthpiece. Each hole communicates with one, two or a few reeds.

Harmonicas are commonly used in blues and folk music, but also in jazz, classical music, country music, rock and roll and pop music.